Ionic Studio looks exciting (I hope it will be free)

The Ionic team has just dropped a bomb in my inbox. The bomb even has a name – Ionic Studio. Still in preview, Studio is Ionic’s official integrated development environment (IDE). I believe they have done a fantastic job by concentrating on the thing that’s their defining feature — UI Components. Of course, things like managing plugins, resources and all from GUI make life easy. But by making it easier to create beautiful interfaces they have done something really good.

Those with some experience with building Ionic apps already know about Ionic Creator. But they also know that the tool is screaming to be updated since long, and is not entirely bug-free. Something like Ionic Studio will really make it easy to create apps quickly.

I like the clean looks it sports. It seems to have been built on the proven and trusty VS Code / Electron platform. Perhaps you have other ideas about its base?

Fascinated by opinionated frameworks

Reading the Rails Doctrine the first time was refreshing. I have gone through it half a dozen times post that. After writing a production-grade project based on Ruby on Rails, something got awoken in me — a fascination for opinionated frameworks. Rails is not the only opinionated framework; there are perhaps a hundred others out there. It’s one of the best and most respected for sure.

An opinionated framework is one that, rather than letting a developer pick her or his choice of building blocks (libraries, components, structure, etc.), cockily comes with a pre-selected building blocks and dictates what to use and how. One may love them or hate them, but they definitely reduce development time exponentially. That’s, at least, true for me.

Today I chanced upon Prettier – an opinionated code formatter with lots of assumptions and only a few customization options, the sort of thing I’d love. It’d be nice to have a powerful tool by my side that could take care of the arduous task of keeping my code nicely formatted all the time, even when it might be at the cost of my own style of coding. I am mostly willing to sacrifice coding style for speed.

I’ll try using it extensively in a personal project. If I have something bad to report, you’ll see another blog post here. If not, it’ll be for the good of Prettier 😉

Fetch API – was I living on Mars?

I stumbled upon Fetch API today. It’s this simple:

fetch(url)
  .then((resp) => resp.json()) // Transform the response object into json
  .then(function(data) {
    // Do what the hell I want to do with received JSON data
    })
  })

 

Seriously! I must have been living on Mars to have not noticed it earlier. XMLHttpRequest and jQuery.ajax — time to move on, ba bye!

Celebrity Recognizer and Bulma

Last Sunday, I took a beginner’s session on getting started with artificial intelligence as part of AI-Creatives meetup Code & Coffee. To get the fancy of attendees, I picked up computer vision; more specifically, image recognition using deep learning.

As time was deliberately limited (90 mins), I focused on inference more than training. Deep learning, as you know, requires time (weeks to months) and resources (specialized GPUs). I based my demo on the Tensorflow’s image retraining tutorial.

Celebrity Recognizer Website

The core idea was to quickly retrain a trained ImageNet model, and then create an API around it for inferences. This API would then be tested by using it on a webpage. I think the session went well. You can see the deck I used here. Source code for classifier, API and webpage is on GitHub.

Continue reading Celebrity Recognizer and Bulma

Coding a neural network in plain JavaScript!

Sounds completely insane, doesn’t it? Mattias Petter Johansson (mpj) has done just that. The best part is that mpj is as clueless about NN’s computer science or mathematical details as probably you are. He has posted a 3-part tutorial about it on his popular YouTube channel Fun Fun Function. I like to think of it as neural networks for JS-coding dummies!

I saw the first part. It’s fun!