Loading... Born a day after the American Independence in Jalandhar, Punjab, India, I've spent most part of my life there. Studied till 5th standard in St. Joseph's Convent School, Jalandhar, and later had to join Apeejay School, Jalandhar as, perhaps, the former school decided boys could be troublesome in a girls' school after 5th. After completing schooling in APJ (till 12th), joined National Institute of Technology [NITJ] (again, in Jalandhar) as a Computer Science & Engineering student in 2005. During the worst period of downtime (recession), got an on-campus placement in Accenture in 2008. Graduating from college took another year after that, and finally joined Accenture in mid-2009. This is my story so far... Btw, you can find me on: google+, twitter last.fm github librarything granular steam
@AnuragBhandari twitter updates
Tech enthusiast, open source evangelist, book worm, software developer, sports fan, passionate gamer, movie buff.
Nov 25

meteorjsMaking reactive and real-time web applications is in fashion these days. Among popular real-time programming frameworks are meteor.js, knockout.js and signalr. Both Knockout and SignalR are developed by Microsoft employees, and integrate seamlessly with Microsoft products. Meteor, on the other hand, is though based on the cross-platform node.js, it is more Linux / Mac-centric than it is Windows. In fact, Meteor’s official documentation is also designed with instructions that pertain to Linux. They don’t even have an official Windows installer for their framework, but depend on a certain Tom Wijsman for that.

It’s true that Linux/Apache is still the dominant server stack, but we still have thousands of corporations that rely on Microsoft’s Windows servers and IIS. And deploying a meteor app on a Windows server is a real pain in the butt because the ever so elegant command meteor bundle doesn’t work in Windows. Last I heard from Tom, implementation of meteor bundle in Windows was in the works. But meteor-win won’t support it until at least v0.5.1.

Although there are workarounds like using a Vagrant VM or msysgit for deploying meteor apps on Windows servers, as I found out through my forum thread, all these workarounds are either too cumbersome or don’t work in all cases. During my constant searching on ways to deploy my meteor app on Windows, I stumbled upon an excellent utility called iisnode, which does that in the best and most elegant way possible.

iisnode is basically meant to host node.js applications is IIS, but again as meteor apps themselves are node.js apps only, using iisnode to host them just works. But some setup and configuration is required before your app is fully hosted.

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Nov 05

TestDisk

TestDisk


Turning on your computer one not-so-fine day just to discover an entire partition (drive on harddisk) gone is nothing short of a nightmare potent enough to give you a mild heart attack. Unfortunately, exactly that happened to me yesterday.

An ardent distro hopper that I am, I recently installed (K)Ubuntu 11.10 on my laptop. Things were all fine for 4 days until I fixed a startup issue with my Windows installation using its DVD. The issue was temporarily fixed and I was able to log into Windows. But the next time I booted into Linux, my Windows partition was no longer being shown in the file manager. I fired up “fdisk -l” just to find out that the Windows partition had been overwritten by another hidden 2GB FAT partition, which was now being shown as a twin duplicate of the original. It didn’t take me much time to realize that the Windows DVD had screwed up my partition table, making the whole 80GB Windows partition disappear!

After some research, I found this excellent opensource partition recovery tool by the name TestDisk. Thanks to its Linux version, I was able to find the lost Windows partition, recover it and write the updated partition table to the harddisk. Although it’s a command-line application, believe me, it’s damn straight-forward, and as simple as any other GUI thing.

(God forbid) In case, some day, you find yourself with a partition or two gone from your harddisk, give TestDisk a try. Highly recommended.

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Dec 31

I keep hearing people say, “I am happy with my Windows; don’t want to switch to an alien OS such as Linux.” And, “Hey, this Linux thing looks cool. But I do not want to switch over to it suddenly (or at all) because my Windows just works.” Even, “I would really like to switch over to Linux, but don’t know how hard it is to make that shift (replacing Windows or dual-booting). And my X-Y-Z app works in Windows, and I’ve heard it doesn’t in Linux.”

Rubbish! Have you ever even tried to know that there existed such a thing as dual-booting? And how easy it is to set up dual-booting?

I have also heard promoters of Linux say, “Now that you know of all the benefits of Linux, it’s time you make the switch to it from your existing OS (Windows).” And, “So what’s holding you back, just make the switch today.” Some even go to such extremes, “You know, you are wasting your precious money on this crap OS (Windows), which first drains all your money and then keeps on crashing. Switch to Linux today, it’s free!”

Rubbish, again! You cannot force Linux down people’s throat just because of your own reasons.

Has anyone noticed how we use the word “switch” so often? Why do we have to *switch* to another OS just to try it out, or because someone told us to, or because it’s free, or because… whatever?

Actually, “We don’t.” To use (or try) Linux, there is always the nice option of dual-booting (yep, that’s the word) Windows with Linux. Or better yet, using Linux on a live CD/DVD/USB (or if you are a geek, you can try Linux through virtualization as well). This way, you’ll get a feel of the incredible OS Linux is, and on the same time not lose access to your favorite (it-just-works) OS (Windows).

That, actually, is the best first step to *switch* from Windows to Linux, if you really decide to later. And, not to mention, this is the best way to encourage users to use Linux.

After all, we cannot ignore the fact that despite getting competition from Linux and Mac since long, Windows still holds the largest piece of market share pie. So the current situation rather kind of demands having to dual-boot along with Windows, instead of instantly switching.

[Image courtesy: Lifehacker]

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May 20

So, what’s keeping me busy these days? It’s office work, of course. Working on quite a challenging and bigger project has its side-effects as well (working till late and missing daily fruit juice doses in my case). Other than that, I am enjoying the work as it has to do with web development, my area of interest.

Being a strong advocate of open-source and Linux, I read a lot of articles on these topics daily. And I hate when people use words like “switch”, “migrate”, etc. when referring to making the move from Windows to Linux. Why do people, who try to compel people to switch from Windows to Linux, forget that there is always an option called “dualbooting” and that Windows still has the astronomically largest market share? I really hope people use the word “dualboot” more when advocating the use of Linux to others. By the way, I am also writing an article highlighting this matter (Why Switch? Dualboot!), which I intend to share pretty soon.

Talking about Linux, the latest Ubuntu release (10.4; Lucid Lynx) has been getting good reviews from all around. I can hardly wait to get my hands on it. I am planning to install it on my home PC (the one currently in use by my Dad and sister).

Also, two of my good friends, Chandan Puggal (working at Aricent) and Amritpal Singh (working at Accenture) recently joined me in Gurgaon (my present work location). :)

Finally, I did mention it earlier also, but it really is a frustrating life without a proper Internet connection. (Looking upward) God, please me my EV-DO back. Amen.

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Oct 12

VS

Windows Vista and Ubuntu Linux – both are totally disparate entities and I am talking about similarities? Yup, I sure am. And I have reasons to believe this.

Most of us know what Vista is. Vista is the latest edition to the most popular operating system (OS) lineup – Windows. For those who are unfamiliar with Ubuntu, Ubuntu is one of the most popular Linux-based OS that is available for free.

Here I discuss some of the similarities that I have noted in due course of my usage of both the operating systems.

Computer
In both, the name given to the central access point to all the disks and partitions on a computer is “Computer”. In earlier versions of Windows, we used to know it with the name “My Computer”.

Sub-folders in user profile folder
The default folders present in the user profile folder (or the home folder) are something like – Documents, Music, Pictures, Videos – in both the OSes.

Graphical effects
Starting from Ubuntu 7.10, both the OSes have given stress on providing graphical desktop effects to the end user. In Ubuntu, the effects are a result of Compiz Fusion software. In Vista, the most common and appealing effect is Flip 3D.

Creation of a new folder
When a new file/folder is created within another folder in either of the OS, the newly created item rearranges itself automatically in alphabetical order with respect to the other items contained by the parent folder. This wasn’t the case in earlier versions of Windows.

Renaming file
When a file is renamed (by right-clicking and choosing “Rename” or by pressing F2) in either of OSes, only the name of the file is selected, leaving the file extension unselected.

Navigation strip
When a folder within a folder within a folder (and so on…) is visited, a navigation strip appears near the top of the explorer/file manager window. In both the OSes, this navigation strip is very similar looking and a helpful aid.

Verdict
Does this imply anything? Were Vista’s features inspired by Ubuntu? Or Ubuntu’s features by Vista? Or neither of the cases. It’s upto you to decide. ;)

Note: The similarities between Vista and Ubuntu are primarily because of the desktop environment used by Ubuntu – GNOME. So, these similarities are common between Vista and many other Linux distributions that use the latest version of GNOME.

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