Loading... Born a day after the American Independence in Jalandhar, Punjab, India, I've spent most part of my life there. Studied till 5th standard in St. Joseph's Convent School, Jalandhar, and later had to join Apeejay School, Jalandhar as, perhaps, the former school decided boys could be troublesome in a girls' school after 5th. After completing schooling in APJ (till 12th), joined National Institute of Technology [NITJ] (again, in Jalandhar) as a Computer Science & Engineering student in 2005. During the worst period of downtime (recession), got an on-campus placement in Accenture in 2008. Graduating from college took another year after that, and finally joined Accenture in mid-2009. This is my story so far... Btw, you can find me on: google+, twitter last.fm github librarything granular steam
@AnuragBhandari twitter updates
Tech enthusiast, open source evangelist, book worm, software developer, sports fan, passionate gamer, movie buff.
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Nov 15

It was bound to happen some day. The existing init system in use by most of the present Linux distros is really not leveraging the performance capabilities of modern hardware to the fullest. Spawning processes one-by-one to get the system up and running costs a lot of precious time, when it is possible to do more in less time using the power of multi-core processors.

It was a welcome surprise to read about this new thingy systemd in the Q&A section of last week’s DistroWatch Weekly. I’m really looking forward to a faster future. :)

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Oct 01

Another of my free time exercises, Unjumble does just that – it unscrambles a jumbled/scrambled word into all possible English dictionary words that can be formed out of that jumbled word. The interface is extremely simple. You have a textbox to input your jumbled word, and as you type, all unjumbled word suggestions start appearing as list items in the combobox below. To copy an unjumbled word to clipboard, just click on it. Simple, isn’t it?

Like QuickCopy, Unjumble was coded in C#, and makes use of SQLite as the portable database to store a huge list of English dictionary words. What’s the most interesting thing about this little app is the algorithm behind it.

There is a pre-prepared database of almost all (58000+) English words [wordlist.txt], stored along with their hashes (words formed by the original words’ individual alphabets in sorted order). The input jumbled word’s hash is then calculated in a similar way, and is compared with the hashes stored in the database. All matches are then displayed in the list box.

I bet, using Unjumble, you’ll never lose your newspaper’s jumbled words game again. ;)

Download: Source Code (1.5 MB) – Installer (1.7 MB)

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Oct 01

A very simple password management tool that I developed in my free time. It aims to simplify the task of copy-pasting frequently used text, like usernames and passwords. A Windows-only tool, it’s code purely in C#, and makes use of the wonderfully portable SQLite to store entries in the backend. The interface includes 2 components (basically 3; one is hidden) — system tray icon and “add content” dialog. All content added through the dialog gets added as a menu item in the system tray icon’s context menu (the one you see on right-clicking the icon). To copy a content from the menu to the clipboard, all you need to do is just click on its entry in the menu and it’s done!

Some features:

  • Store content – frequently used text, like usernames.
  • Store passwords – these are masked by content tags, which are then shown in the context menu (in red color).
  • Hotkeys – the top 3 entries in the context menu can be quickly copied to the clipboard using the key combinations of CTRL+F1, CTRL+F2 and CTRL+F3.

For a password, its respective content tag acts as a mask to hide it under its name. Say you’re adding your Gmail password @ILuvKatz!! in the dialog, and set its content tag as Gmail Password, the password’s entry will appear in the menu in red color with the name Gmail Password. When you click on Gmail Password, your actual password will be copied to the clipboard.

There is no easy provision of modifying existing content entries. But I’ve provided a QueryEditor (invoked by pressing CTRL+Q in the “Add Content” dialog), where you can change the content entries by issuing your regular SQL queries. For example:

UPDATE content SET content='@IHateKatz!!' WHERE content_tag='Gmail Password'

Download: Source Code (1.1 MB) – Installer (1.2 MB)

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Dec 31

I keep hearing people say, “I am happy with my Windows; don’t want to switch to an alien OS such as Linux.” And, “Hey, this Linux thing looks cool. But I do not want to switch over to it suddenly (or at all) because my Windows just works.” Even, “I would really like to switch over to Linux, but don’t know how hard it is to make that shift (replacing Windows or dual-booting). And my X-Y-Z app works in Windows, and I’ve heard it doesn’t in Linux.”

Rubbish! Have you ever even tried to know that there existed such a thing as dual-booting? And how easy it is to set up dual-booting?

I have also heard promoters of Linux say, “Now that you know of all the benefits of Linux, it’s time you make the switch to it from your existing OS (Windows).” And, “So what’s holding you back, just make the switch today.” Some even go to such extremes, “You know, you are wasting your precious money on this crap OS (Windows), which first drains all your money and then keeps on crashing. Switch to Linux today, it’s free!”

Rubbish, again! You cannot force Linux down people’s throat just because of your own reasons.

Has anyone noticed how we use the word “switch” so often? Why do we have to *switch* to another OS just to try it out, or because someone told us to, or because it’s free, or because… whatever?

Actually, “We don’t.” To use (or try) Linux, there is always the nice option of dual-booting (yep, that’s the word) Windows with Linux. Or better yet, using Linux on a live CD/DVD/USB (or if you are a geek, you can try Linux through virtualization as well). This way, you’ll get a feel of the incredible OS Linux is, and on the same time not lose access to your favorite (it-just-works) OS (Windows).

That, actually, is the best first step to *switch* from Windows to Linux, if you really decide to later. And, not to mention, this is the best way to encourage users to use Linux.

After all, we cannot ignore the fact that despite getting competition from Linux and Mac since long, Windows still holds the largest piece of market share pie. So the current situation rather kind of demands having to dual-boot along with Windows, instead of instantly switching.

[Image courtesy: Lifehacker]

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