Loading... Born a day after the American Independence in Jalandhar, Punjab, India, I've spent most part of my life there. Studied till 5th standard in St. Joseph's Convent School, Jalandhar, and later had to join Apeejay School, Jalandhar as, perhaps, the former school decided boys could be troublesome in a girls' school after 5th. After completing schooling in APJ (till 12th), joined National Institute of Technology [NITJ] (again, in Jalandhar) as a Computer Science & Engineering student in 2005. During the worst period of downtime (recession), got an on-campus placement in Accenture in 2008. Graduating from college took another year after that, and finally joined Accenture in mid-2009. This is my story so far... Btw, you can find me on: google+, twitter last.fm github librarything granular steam
@AnuragBhandari twitter updates
Tech enthusiast, open source evangelist, book worm, software developer, sports fan, passionate gamer, movie buff.
  • Libre / Open Office sucks beyond measure. Seriously, we are no longer living in 2003! A highly overrated suite! Even Google Docs is better! —
  • Two things I hate in my Dell Inspiron 15R -- screen and touchpad buttons. #dell #ThingsIHate
  • Hope sabse badi tope ~ Navjot Singh Sidhu —
Jan 28
LXPUP -- Puppy with LXDE

LXPUP — Puppy with LXDE

A couple of days back, I got myself a new puppy. Nope, not the dog sort. It’s a variant of Puppy Linux, and comes with LXDE. The most wonderful aspect of Lxpup is that it is a perfect fusion of an ultra-lightweight feel (of Puppy) and a more usable (and beautiful looking) desktop environment (LXDE). Really, Puppy works so amazingly out-of-the-box and is so incredibly damn fast that it is pretty hard to resist. Add to it its binary compatibility with Ubuntu 12.04 (Precise), and that makes it nothing short of legendary. In short, that gives users the ability to download apps from one of the biggest package repositories on planet.

Puppy’s default window manager, JWM, is kinda annoying to say the least. LXDE is a decent mix of usability and small size, and blends so well with Puppy. In fact, Lxpup’s default customization of LXDE is pretty enough to make you want to keep using it for long.

I’m currently loving my Puppy experience. It runs completely off my USB pendrive. And needless to say, I’m making this post from within Puppy. :)

Tagged with:
Tagged with:
Jan 09
Slax 7 Desktop

Slax 7 Desktop

I was so impressed with the latest iteration of my oldest favorite mini distro, especially its KDE implementation, that I immediately wanted to make Granular’s next release look like and as fast as Slax. Slax 7 comes loaded with all the bare essentials that actually make sense. Plus its ability to run from a USB drive without much efforts makes it a winner to me.

Everything just works, very straightforwardly. It has a lot of stuff packed in a small size of 220MB, which is a marvelous feat (made possible by use of compressed/packaged modules). But it may or may not detect all of your hardware correctly. For me, it didn’t recognize my WiFi module, which I got working by installing the necessary firmware files (look here for instructions). My laptop’s (Synaptics) touchpad performed fine, but its vertical edge scrolling didn’t. I corrected that using the command synclient VertEdgeScroll=1.

Tagged with:
Sep 05
Raspberry Pi

Photo Credit: Wikipedia

A geeky thing for the geeks, but generally touted as an educational device – that’s what Raspberry Pi (wiki) is in simplest words. It has pretty much the same hardware configuration as did my first PC. And now that it’s finally out in the wild, it’s perhaps every geek’s dream to extract the hell of the maximum juice out of it. Engadget came up with a nice article about putting the thing to good use: housing a Linux distro! And that too a GUI one (LXDE)! Now that really got me drooling. If I could get my hands on this cheap sweety (just $25!), the first thing I’ll do is… install Linux, what else. :)

Raspbian

Raspbian running on Raspberry Pi. Photo Credit: Engadget

Tagged with:
Nov 15

It was bound to happen some day. The existing init system in use by most of the present Linux distros is really not leveraging the performance capabilities of modern hardware to the fullest. Spawning processes one-by-one to get the system up and running costs a lot of precious time, when it is possible to do more in less time using the power of multi-core processors.

It was a welcome surprise to read about this new thingy systemd in the Q&A section of last week’s DistroWatch Weekly. I’m really looking forward to a faster future. :)

Tagged with:
preload preload preload